Widmann’s Language Creator

A tool for generating on-demand languages.

Please fill in the questionnaire below, or click here to generate a random language.

Choose a language from this list to generate a language similar to it:

Or pick one from this list to generate the polar opposite:

When you’re done, please click on this button to generate the language:

Phonology

Consonants

Labials

Labial consonants include /p/, /b/ and /m/.

How many labials?

01

Retroflex consonants

Retroflex consonants are widely used in Indian languages.

How many retroflex consonants?

01

Nasal stops

Nasal stops.

Should it use nasal stops (like /m/ and /n/)?

01

Voicing

Voiced consonants.

Should it use voicing?

01

Aspiration

Aspirated consonants.

Should it use aspiration?

01

Fricatives

Fricatives.

Should it have fricatives?

01

Vowels

Oral Vowel Heights

How many degrees of opening should the language have? The most common number is three, resulting in a typical vowel inventory of /a e i o u/, but values from two to five are all well-documented.

24

Nasal Vowel Heights

Languages sometimes have as many nasal vowels as they do oral ones, but often there are much fewer. For instance, French distinguishes four degrees of opening in its oral vowel system, but only two in its nasal one.

How many degrees of opening for nasal vowels should the language have? 0 means no nasal vowels, and 1 means as many as oral vowels, but you can specify a number inbetween.

01

Distintive vowel length

Some language distinguish short and long vowels.

Should the language do this?

Yes
No

Reduced Vowel Heights

Languages often reduce the number of vowels in subsequent syllabels.

How many degrees of opening for reduced vowels should the language have? 0 means only one (schwa), and 1 means using the full vowel set.

01

Vowel Backness

Some languages phonologically only distinguish vowel height, but it's much more common to distinguish between front and back vowels. Some languages furthermore add a central vowel series to the mix.

How many degrees of backness should the language employ?

13

Vowel Roundedness

Some languages phonologically only distinguish vowel height, but it's much more common to distinguish between front and rounded vowels. Some languages furthermore add a central vowel series to the mix.

Should roundedness be used?

Front rounded
Back unrounded
Neither

Morphology and marking

Syntactic relations

Nominative and accusative

Should the subject and object be marked?

Nominative-Accusative
Ergative
No marking

The AP

PPs

Possession

Head marking





Dependent marking





Case

Affixes and other good stuff

Prefixes

To what extent should the language make use of prefixes?

01

Suffixes

To what extent should the language make use of suffixes?

01

Marking

Locus of Marking in Possessive Noun Phrases

Should the possessor in a possessive construction be marked, for instance by using a adposition or grammatical case?

Yes
No

Marking of owned (possessive)

Should the owned in a possessive construction be marked?

Yes
No

Other things

Suffixaufnahme

Suffixaufnahme (German: [ˈzʊfɪksˌaʊfˌnaːmə], "suffix resumption"), also known as case stacking, is a linguistic phenomenon used in forming a genitive construction, whereby prototypically a genitive noun agrees with its head noun. It was first recognized in Old Georgian and some other Caucasian and ancient Middle Eastern languages as well as many Australian languages, and almost invariably coincides with agglutinativity. A subject, for instance, would be marked with a subjective affix as well as a genitive affix. So, for example, in Old Georgian perx-ni k'ac-isa-ni (foot-NOM.PL man-GEN-NOM.PL) 'a man's feet', the genitival noun phrase agrees in case (nominative) and number (plural) with the head noun. However, while such a possessive construction is most frequently found in suffixaufnahme, other nominal constructions may also show similar behavior. In Old Georgian, a postpositional phrase modifying a noun could take on that noun's case and number features: "Ra turpa prinvelia!" c'amoidzaxa ert-ma bavshv-ta-gan-ma [one-ERG child-GEN.PL-from-ERG] ("'What a wonderful bird!' exclaimed one of the children") has the ergative (also called narrative) case -ma on ertma repeated in the modifying postpositional phrase, headed by -gan.

Polysynthesis

Languages such as Turkish and Greenlandic have a lot of suffixes expressing ideas that would normally be expressed through verbs, adjectives, or adverbs in other languages. For instance, in Greenlandic, "to have" is often expressed through the suffix -qarpoq, e.g., illu "house" > illoqarpoq "he has a house". (Be aware that Turkish isn't normally considered a polysynthetic language, but it really ought to be, considering examples such as "Avrupalılaştıramadık" "one that is unable to be Europeanised".)

Degree of polysynthesis?

01

Word order

Greenberg

Order of verb, subject and object

SVO
VSO
SOV
VOS
OVS
OSV

NAdj or AdjN

NDem or DemN

NNum or NumN

NRel og RelN

NGen or GenN

Should the possessor/owner precede or follow the possessed/owned?

Precede
Follow

Prepositions or postpositions

Should the language use prepositions or postpositions?

prep
postp

Sample texts

The hunter's daughter